NHL Morning Coffee Headlines – September 7, 2018

by | Sep 7, 2018 | News, NHL | 15 comments

Latest on Vladimir Tarasenko, Corey Crawford, Tyler Seguin, Milan Lucic and more in your NHL morning coffee headlines.

SPORTSNET: After recovering from offseason surgery on his left shoulder, St. Louis Blues winger Vladimir Tarasenko hopes to be ready when training camp opens next week.

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES: Blackhawks president John McDonagh is confident, but not certain, goaltender Corey Crawford will be taking part in training camp next week.

Chicago Blackhawks remain hopeful goaltender Corey Crawford will attend training camp next week. (Photo via NHL Images)

SPECTOR’S NOTE: Crawford missed most of last season to a suspected concussion. His absence contributed to the Blackhawks missing the playoffs last season so it’s understandable why there’s concern over his current status. 

NHL.COM’s Mike Zeisberger reports center Tyler Seguin said contract negotiations with the Dallas Stars have picked up since last week. He remains hopeful of getting an extension in place before the season opens next month.

EDMONTON SUN: Oilers left wing Milan Lucic hopes to overcome last season’s poor performance and prove he’s still an effective top-six forward. Lucic managed just 10 goals and 34 points in 82 games last season, including just one goal in his final 46 games.

SPECTOR’S NOTE: If Lucic doesn’t regain his scoring touch the Oilers will have a very expensive checking-line winger on their hands. As per Cap Friendly, he’s entering the third season of his seven-year, $42-million contract. 

LAS VEGAS SUN: Golden Knights general manager George McPhee claims supplements provided by the team to Nate Schmidt weren’t responsible for the defenseman’s 20-game suspension for violating the NHL’s PED policy. Schmidt said he only used what was provided to him by the club, suggesting cross-contamination may be been responsible for his testing positive for a trace amount of a banned substance. McPhee claimed his team’s supplements are all league-approved but continues to stand by the defenseman.

USA TODAY: The NHL has begun “a formal investigation into former Los Angeles Kings defenseman Slava Voynov 2015 domestic-abuse conviction to determine whether he should be allowed to return to the NHL”. Earlier this summer, Voynov was granted a dismissal of his conviction by a Los Angeles Superior Court.

SPECTOR’S NOTE: Even if the league grants Voynov’s reinstatement, teams could pass on signing him over concerns of a negative reaction by fans and media. 

THE TENNESSEAN:  The NHL will announce its punishment for Nashville Predators forward Austin Watson by Sept. 13. In July, Watson pleaded no contest to a charge of misdemeanor assault for reportedly hitting his girlfriend outside a gas station in June. He was placed on three months probation, “26 weeks of batterer intervention and an inpatient program for alcohol and drugs.”

WINNIPEG SUN: The Jets re-signed goaltender Eric Comrie to a one-year, two-way contract worth $650K at the NHL level.

NBC SPORTS: The Columbus Blue Jackets re-signed team president John Davidson, general manager Jarmo Kekalainen and assistant GM Bill Zito. Contract terms weren’t disclosed. 

SPORTSNET: NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said December is the earliest the league board of governors could vote on approving a new franchise in Seattle. He also added the league wasn’t changing its marijuana policy as Canada legalizes cannabis on Oct. 17. 

 








15 Comments

  1. The boys wont be smokin ana tokin!

  2. Nope. Just cocaine. Much better

  3. z”SPECTOR’S NOTE: Even if the league grants Voynov’s reinstatement, teams could pass on signing him over concerns of a negative reaction by fans and media.”

    Bobby Hull is still in the Hall Of Fame and it hasn’t seemed to have affected his appearances at dinners, etc.

    • Jason Kidd in the NBA plead guilty to spousal abuse, got a $200 fine and wasn’t even suspended. Now he’s in the hall of fame. Floyd Mayweather has beat on a few different women and he’s almost a billionaire. Voynov did his time and his wife forgives him. Does the guy have to pay for this for the rest of his life? Not that I am condoning any of these guys at all, I despise what they did, but it’s time to move on. If Michael Vick can go back to the NFL after what he did then why can’t Voynov earn a living? I think there will be at least 15 teams that would take him on in a second because he’s talented.

  4. Any team that can afford Zoynov contractually will stumbling over each other to negotiate with LA to acquire his rights. He was LA’s #2 Dman when he left the NHL at the age of 25 now just 28 he will be a hot commodity. The type of Dman every team covets, solid 2 way Dman.

  5. Different times and different eras. By no way am I condoning Bobby Hulls behaviour or the abuse of his wife and kids, but surely an 80 year old man knows more than me the differences from the 70s and now almost 40 to 50 years later. It was frowned upon back then, but not illegal. Its illegal now. Major differences. Also legal in Russia where Slava Voynov is from, literally a law was passed making it legal, to beat your wife. I am an advocate for human rights but personally believe that the Hall of Fame should be about the game of which it is about. Trying to reshape history in order to be politically correct in the present is not a progressive mindset. Yes he was a crappy human being, but that does not diminish what kind of a hockey player he was. Part of the reason for the NHL’s policies are because of people like him. So as much as I find it deplorable, Bobby Hull helped shape the code of conduct to what it is today, which is 0 tolerance. Sometimes crappy people are good at sports too.

    • I disagree completely, sports are not just sports, it can be a unifying factor that crosses political, religious and racial lines. Its not just a game of hockey or football these people are role models for our children.

      Hull and others like him may have been great but they have no place in any hall of fame. Is this something we want our kids to aspire to? What message does that send to juniors growing up learning about the sport?

      • Fair comments, domestic abuse is repugnant. But isn’t there a point where debt to society is repaid? We want murderers to be reintegrated into society and given a second chance. Voynov lost a ton of money when his contract was voided and he was found guilty in court. Is he never to be allowed to play in the NHL again?

    • That doesn’t stop some from banning the Confederate flag for what it represents, or the Swastika (which has been around a lot longer than the Nazis), or removing statues of Sir John A. McDonald because of his involvement in the relocation of native youngsters. Give them time – they’ll soon turn to the likes of Hull, or out and out racists in baseball’s hall of fame like Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, Cap Anson. Meanwhile, Shoeless Joe Jackson and Pete Rose continue to be banned.

  6. Karma to Lucic after his stupid comments to Dale Weiss when shaking hands when Boston was eliminated. People get what they deserve … and it is a pleasure watching Lucic take the heat for not performing up to the contract that grossly overpays him.

    • Yeah Dale Weiss was a class act never ever said a word to anyone yeah wake up Weiss was no angel. Looch should have flattened him like a pancake.

  7. Hmmm, I wonder why the Blackhawks are terrified of going into the season with Cam Ward as their number one tender? They will be out of playoff contention by January 1.

  8. Kent, if your kid becomes a wife beater because Bobby Hull was, or Slava Voynov, then you did not do your job as a parent. Yes kids do aspire to be like their heroes, but if they still idolize Voynov for what he did, it is their own poor moral compass which is not professional athletes jobs to teach. Bobby Hull is infamous for his off ice problems. Fame is not always a good thing. The world isn’t all rainbows and butterflies, and trying to sweep horrible truths under the rug is why these problems will always exist.

    • Thank you, like Charles Barkley said “I am not a role model.”