NHL Morning Coffee Headlines – October 16, 2016



NHL Morning Coffee Headlines – October 16, 2016

The Toronto Maple Leafs officially retired the numbers of 17 players.

The Toronto Maple Leafs officially retired the numbers of 17 players.

Leafs retire 17 player numbers. Details & more in this morning’s collection of NHL headlines. 

NHL.COMMitch Marner tallied his first NHL goal in the Toronto Maple Leafs 4-1 win over the Boston Bruins. Prior to the game, the Leafs announced in a pregame ceremony they were retiring the numbers of 17 players, including Wendel Clark, Doug Gilmour, Dave Keon, Darryl Sittler, Mats Sundin, Borje Salming, Turk Broda, Syl Apps, Frank Mahovlich and Johnny Bower. 

SPECTOR’S NOTE: This was an honor long overdue for those Leafs legends. Nice to see the current management and ownership finally do the right thing and retire those numbers. 

Richard Panik’s hat trick lifted the Chicago Blackhawks to a 5-3 win over the Nashville Predators. 

Joe Colborne’s hat trick helped the Colorado Avalanche nip the Dallas Stars 6-5. 

Daniel Winnik two goals lifted gave the Washington Capitals a 2-1 victory over the New York Islanders

Phil Kessel tallied his second straight game-winning goal to give the Pittsburgh Penguins a 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks.

Chris Stewart had a Gordie Howe hat trick (goal, assist, fight) as the Minnesota Wild edged the Winnipeg Jets 4-3.

NBC SPORTS: The Columbus Blue Jackets have suspended forward Gregory Campbell for failing to report to their AHL affiliate 

OTTAWA SUN: John Horan wonders why NHL Hall of Famer Phil Esposito’s legacy hasn’t received proper recognition in Canada. Esposito set several scoring records (many eventually broken by Wayne Gretzky) and led Team Canada to victory over the Soviet Union in the 1972 Summit Series. 

SPECTOR’S NOTE: I believe part of the reason why Esposito doesn’t get his just due is he was overshadowed by teammate Bobby Orr, who was the NHL’s dominant, game-changing star during Espo’s glory years in the late-’60s and early-’70s. Some also considered Esposito a one-dimensional scorer who merely parked himself near the crease and swatted in rebounds. A better appreciation of his game didn’t occur until the Summit Series.